Army Reserve Command "Best Warriors"

Dedicated to coverage of all Army Reserve "Best Warrior" candidates

The Toughest Day…

Posted by geraldostlund on July 15, 2009

The toughest day…

  Today the competitors went through, what I believe is, the toughest day of the competition.  They woke up at 4:30 a.m. to get their equipment ready, load the bus and be transported to the starting point of the 10k road march.  They stepped off at 6 a.m. with their body’s sore, legs cramping, and blistered bloody feet.  After walking more than ten miles total yesterday with all that weight on them, they weren’t looking forward to this morning’s foot march. But it has to be done to earn the title Non-Commissioned/Soldier of The Year.

  It wasn’t an easy task, as they soon found out, walking up and down the hills of Ft McCoy.  I remember one steep hill in particular last year. After getting to the top of the hill my legs curled up cramping and I felt I was done at that point.  These competitors, I could tell were feeling the same. But they kept moving. (SPC Ludwig and SSG Hill making it to the to of the steep hill)Spc. Jeffrey-Tyler Eisner, from Poughquag, N.Y. representing USACAPOC, rests after the ruck march during the 2009 Army Reserve Best Warrior Competition at Fort McCoy, Wis., July 15, 2009.

   The first soldier crossed the finish line at one hour and thirty five minutes.  After that the rest of them followed in at an average of one hour and fifty minutes. (SPC Ludwig after crossing the finish line).

Spc. Jeffrey-Tyler Eisner, from Poughquag, N.Y. representing USACAPOC, rests after the ruck march during the 2009 Army Reserve Best Warrior Competition at Fort McCoy, Wis., July 15, 2009.

   After the road march they sat down to have a box lunch for breakfast, and some of them were going over the warrior tasks and battle drills, which is the next event after weapons qualification (day). In the weapons qualification, the soldiers will fire at targets up to 300 meters away. Some of the warrior tasks and battle drills, they will be graded on, consist of several weapon disassembly and assembly, throwing hand grenades, radio communication skills, combat first aid, and improvised explosive device situations. All these tasks and drills are being performed in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    Soon after completing these events they will move on to weapons qualification (night).  All this in one day, ending at midnight.  Like I said, the toughest, and forgot to mention the longest, day of the competition.

 

SSG Francisco Gutierrez

Check out the photos on Flickr, Videos on Vimeo, and Audio on the Army Reserve site.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: